Who has the most hits in one season for every MLB franchise?

The name of the game in baseball is, well, getting on base. Sure, you can talk a walk or lean into a pitch to get to first. However, every batter wants to get a hit, right? That’s a lot more fun than taking four balls. Who are the players with the most hits for each MLB franchise? Here’s the list of the single-season hit kings around the majors.

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Arizona Diamondbacks – Luis Gonzalez

Arizona Diamondbacks – Luis Gonzalez

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When you think of Gonzalez, you probably think of 2001 when he led the Diamondbacks to the World Series thanks in part to his 57 homers. That wasn’t the first year that he did a lot of damage at the plate, though. In 1999, Gonzalez led the National League with 206 hits. That’s the most ever for an Arizona hitter.

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Atlanta Braves – Hugh Duffy

Atlanta Braves – Hugh Duffy

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We’re going old school here. Like, Boston Beaneaters old school. The 19th century old school. Duffy led the majors with a whopping 237 hits in…1894. His batting average was .440 that season. If you are curious about the Braves record in the modern era of baseball, Tommy Holmes had 224 hits in 1945.

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Baltimore Orioles – George Sisler

Baltimore Orioles – George Sisler

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For many years, Sisler was the hit king, routinely racking up over 200 hits a season. The top year, though, he had 257 hits in 1920. That was the MLB record for many years, keeping Sisler’s name in the spotlight for decades.

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Boston Red Sox – Wade Boggs

Boston Red Sox – Wade Boggs

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When you think of batting and the Red Sox, the first name that comes to mind is probably Ted Williams. That makes sense, as he owns most of Boston’s hitting records. What he doesn’t have, though, is the record for the most hits in a season. That belongs to Boggs, another excellent hitter and chicken enthusiast. He racked up 240 hits in 1985.

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Chicago Cubs – Rogers Hornsby

Chicago Cubs – Rogers Hornsby

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Hornsby is primarily remembered for his legendary tenure with the Cardinals. Spoiler alert: Get ready to see his name again on this list. However, when he was 33 he joined the Cubs for the 1929 season. That year he won his second MVP, thanks in part to putting up 229 hits for the Cubbies.

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Chicago White Sox – Eddie Collins

Chicago White Sox – Eddie Collins

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The 1920 White Sox had quite the team, with the three top hit seasons for the franchise all in that year. Beating out “Shoeless” Joe Jackson and Buck Weaver was Collins, who had 224 hits. Unlike Jackson and Weaver, he also was not banned from baseball or the Hall of Fame for throwing the World Series.

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Cincinnati Reds – Pete Rose

Cincinnati Reds – Pete Rose

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Speaking of guys banned from baseball, Rose is the hit king of MLB to this day, for better or worse. He has five of the top six seasons in terms of hits for the Reds, and that includes his best campaign when he had 230 hits in 1973. Don’t bet on baseball when you work in baseball.

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Cleveland Indians – “Shoeless” Joe Jackson

Cleveland Indians – “Shoeless” Joe Jackson

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That’s right. You probably think of Jackson as a White Sox player, because that’s the team he was on when he got banned — and also because of “Field of Dreams.” However, he spent as many seasons in Cleveland, six, as he did in Chicago. With the Indians he had 233 hits in 1911, his first full year in the majors.

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Colorado Rockies – Dante Bichette

Colorado Rockies – Dante Bichette

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Coors Field was good for Bichette. In five seasons in the majors before arriving in Colorado, he had 38 homers. He hit 40 in 139 games in 1995. That being said, it was 1998 when he led the majors in hits with 219. Got to love that thin air in Denver.

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Detroit Tigers – Ty Cobb

Detroit Tigers – Ty Cobb

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No surprises here. Cobb was one of the first stars of baseball despite his cantankerous personality. His .366 career batting average is the best of any player. That helped him rack up a ton of hits, including 248 in 1911.

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Houston Astros – Jose Altuve

Houston Astros – Jose Altuve

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How do you make it in the majors? One way is being an elite hitter. Four of the top five seasons in Astros history belong to Altuve, and he’s still in his prime. His top season was 2014 when he picked up 225 hits. No trash cans required (that we know of).

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Kansas City Royals – Willie Wilson

Kansas City Royals – Willie Wilson

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Wilson is known for his speed more than anything. This is a guy who once stole 83 bases in a season. In 1980 he swiped 79 bags, but that’s not why we are talking about that campaign. He had 230 hits that season, including a whopping 15 triples. And yet somehow he didn’t make the All-Star Game.

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Los Angeles Angels – Darin Erstad

Los Angeles Angels – Darin Erstad

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The year 2000 was so bizarre for Erstad. It’s the only season in which he hit more than 20 homers or had a batting average over .300. In fact, he had a .355 batting average that year. He also led the majors with 240 hits. Maybe someday Mike Trout will own every Angels record, but right now Erstad is still atop the rankings.

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Los Angeles Dodgers – Babe Herman

Los Angeles Dodgers – Babe Herman

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Herman did not have a remarkable career, but in 1930 he had one of the best campaigns in Dodgers history. That year, he set the Dodgers record for single-season batting average, slugging percentage, OPS and, yes, hits. Herman had 241 hits that season, and yet he wasn’t even the best “Babe” in baseball that year. (For the record, Herman is second from the right in the photo.)

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Miami Marlins – Juan Pierre

Miami Marlins – Juan Pierre

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Pierre is one of the preeminent slap hitters of the modern era. The dude hit 18 homers in 1,994 career games. However, he was almost always healthy, he had five straight seasons of 162 games, and his speed helped him eke out plenty of singles. Long story short, he had 221 hits in 2004 to lead the National League.

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Milwaukee Brewers – Cecil Cooper

Milwaukee Brewers – Cecil Cooper

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Cooper had a mighty fine career in Milwaukee, twice leading the National League in doubles and RBI. He never led the league in hits, but he did set a Brewers record in 1980. That year he had 219 hits while also winning a Gold Glove for good measure.

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Minnesota Twins – Rod Carew

Minnesota Twins – Rod Carew

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He won Rookie of the Year and an MVP. He’s in the Hall of Fame. Adam Sandler name-checked him in “Chanukah Song.” Carew also twice led the majors in hits with the Twins. That includes in 1977 when he used his bat to get on base 239 times. It also happened to be the year he won the MVP.

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New York Mets – Lance Johnson

New York Mets – Lance Johnson

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We’ll forgive you for forgetting about Johnson. After all, he made only one All-Star Game, and that was in 1996. Yes, that was the year he set the Mets franchise record for hits. He racked up 227 of them to lead the majors, and he also topped the league in triples with 21. After that, his career was basically over.

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New York Yankees – Don Mattingly

New York Yankees – Don Mattingly

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There are so many legends in the history of the Yankees, and yet it’s Mattingly, who isn’t even in the Hall of Fame, who has the most hits in a season. It’s not like Mattingly had a bad career. He won one MVP and nine Gold Gloves while making six All-Star Games. The year after that MVP win, Mattingly picked up 238 hits in 1986. That’s something Babe Ruth or Lou Gehrig never did.

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Oakland Athletics – Al Simmons

Oakland Athletics – Al Simmons

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Simmons played for the Athletics in their Philadelphia days, starting his career back in 1924. The very next year he notched 253 hits to lead the majors. Simmons made the Hall of Fame — a career .334 save percentage can do that for you — but he arguably never had a better year than 1925, his sophomore campaign.

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Philadelphia Phillies – Lefty O’Doul

Philadelphia Phillies – Lefty O’Doul

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We turn to the team that still plays in Philadelphia. Lefty O’Doul has a classic old-timey baseball name, and indeed he made his debut in 1919. O’Doul had a short career, as he only played in 11 seasons and 970 games. However, in 1929 he managed to tally 254 hits while leading the majors with a .398 batting average. Interestingly, O’Doul began his career as a pitcher before returning to the majors to transform into a hitter. What could have been had he started in the outfield?

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Pittsburgh Pirates – Paul Waner

Pittsburgh Pirates – Paul Waner

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Paul and his brother, Lloyd, are both in the Hall of Fame, and they both had great careers with the Pirates. The two combine for seven of the 10 top seasons in terms of hits in Pittsburgh history. It’s Paul who tops the charts, though, with 237 hits in 1927. (That’s Paul on the left and Lloyd on the right)

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San Diego Padres – Tony Gwynn

San Diego Padres – Tony Gwynn

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You could say that Gwynn knew how to hit. Seven of the top eight seasons for hits in Padres history belong to him. Mark Loretta got in there somehow. The top four all belong to Gwynn, though, including when he had 220 hits in 1997.

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San Francisco Giants – Bill Terry

San Francisco Giants – Bill Terry

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Terry was no Barry Bonds. He never had more than 28 homers in a season. Also, he played his entire career in New York. When it came to purely picking up hits, though, Bonds has nothing on Terry. In 1930 he had 254 hits, most in Giants history. Oh, and he hit .401 as well.

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Seattle Mariners – Ichiro Suzuki

Seattle Mariners – Ichiro Suzuki

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There are people who consider Ichiro the true hit king. Some argue that because when you add his hits from Japan with his hits in MLB he has more than Pete Rose. Others just really don’t like Rose at all. However you slice it, Ichiro is the single-season hit king by any measure. In 2004 he picked up 262 hits, finally beating George Sisler’s long-standing record.

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St. Louis Cardinals – Rogers Hornsby

St. Louis Cardinals – Rogers Hornsby

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We promised Hornsby would be back, and here he is. The Hall of Famer is the only person to have the single-season franchise hits record for two different teams. Before he joined the Cubs, Hornsby had 250 hits in 1922 for the Cardinals.

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Tampa Bay Rays – Aubrey Huff

Tampa Bay Rays – Aubrey Huff

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We don’t want to talk about Huff. Check out his Twitter sometime if you want to know why. (Also, please never check out his Twitter.) In 2003 he had 198 hits, which is the Tampa record. Good for him. We’d rather celebrate Carl Crawford, who has six of the top 10 seasons in Rays history.

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Texas Rangers – Michael Young

Texas Rangers – Michael Young

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Young was one of the faces of the Rangers franchise for many years, but his legacy may be a bit underrated. He made seven All-Star Games for Texas. Young also has the top four seasons for hits among all Rangers batters. The best of the bunch was in 2005 when he tallied 221 hits.

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Toronto Blue Jays – Vernon Wells

Toronto Blue Jays – Vernon Wells

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His big contract he signed quickly made him an albatross for the Angels, but back in Toronto Wells had some impressive campaigns. The 2003 season was clearly his best campaign, and that’s the year he’s here for. That season he led the majors with 215 hits, including a whopping 49 doubles.

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Washington Nationals – Vladimir Guerrero

Washington Nationals – Vladimir Guerrero

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Remember, the Nationals used to be the Montreal Expos. Guerrero never suited up for the Nationals, but he was a legend in Montreal. Vladdie won his only MVP with the Angels the year after he left Montreal, which has to sting, but Expos fans can take solace in this. In 2002 Guerrero led the National League in 2006, setting a record that still stands in Washington.

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